FOR & Historic Peace Churches discuss ecumenical engagement for peace and justice

Book review: Snakes and Ladders

By Rene Wadlow
Thursday, September 27, 2012, 9:14am

Book review: Snakes and Ladders

The symbolic start of the Fellowship of Reconciliation was in 1914, on the eve of the First World War. Henry Hodgkin, a British member of the Religious Society of Friends and a former missionary doctor to China, and Friedrich Siegmund-Schultz, German Lutheran pastor at Potsdam and a chaplain to the Kaiser, having participated in Constance [Konstanz], Germany [on the border of Switzerland] in a conference of the World Alliance for Promoting International Friendship through the Churches, parted saying, “We are one in Christ and can never be at war.”

Hodgkins started organizing British Quakers for peace and reconciliation work, and in 1915 Hodgkin went to the United States to start the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), drawing especially on his Quaker contacts. While Quakers have always been active in FOR, they have also created specifically Quaker institutions working for peace such as the two Quaker U.N.Offices — the New York office being the responsibility of theAmerican Friends Service Committee and the Geneva U.N.Office that of the Quaker Peace and Social Witness of the Britain Yearly Meeting.


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FOR & Historic Peace Churches discuss ecumenical engagement for peace and justice

By Timothy Seidel
Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 1:49pm

FOR & Historic Peace Churches discuss ecumenical engagement for peace and justice

On November 18-19, the Church of the Brethren hosted the annual meeting of the Historic Peace Churches/Fellowship of Reconciliation Consultative Committee for a time of fellowship, mutual support and conversation on ecumenical engagement for peace and justice.

The Historic Peace Churches (HPC)/Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) Consultative Committee (“Committee” below) is a group of Friends, Brethren, Mennonites and representatives of the Fellowship of Reconciliation USA.  Members have historically come together to uphold the Gospel of peace through dialogue and advocacy in faith circles and support for appropriate interventions where nonviolent witness is needed.


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