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    Reflections on Returning to the Peace Community

    by Tom Power

    When we arrived in the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó for Christmas, former accompanier Emily and I didn’t really know what to expect. Neither of us had been there for some time, but we were excited that the Peace Community was going to have their Christmas celebration in the new “aldea” (small village), a 45 minute walk from La Unión.

    The new “aldea” that the Peace Community has constructed is amazing. About a dozen families live in the newly constructed homes that overlook the Gulf of Urabá, building community through shared projects such as a flourishing garden. This “aldea” is named after Rigoberto Guzman, one of the Peace Community’s leaders who was killed in the massacre of 2000. He is one of many leaders whose bravery and commitment to the Peace Community motivates them to continue moving forward. I was inspired at their new space, and the way they have created rebirth amidst ongoing armed conflict.

    Unfortunately, they need this continued resistance because the conflict in Urabá is far from over.  While the FARC demobilized following the 2016 Peace Accords with the government, paramilitary groups continue to grow more powerful in San José. In the short time we were there, paramilitary groups issued death threats to the Peace Community and extorted butchers who live in the main village, just a half mile away from San Josecito- the biggest Peace Community settlement. Paramilitary groups are also charging a fee for each head of cattle owned by the residents of San José, making cattle ranching prohibitively expensive.

    Of course, the Peace Community refuses to be extorted, putting them at even higher risk.

    Furthermore, the 17th brigade has placed a writ for the protection of constitutional rights against the Peace Community. The 17th brigade alleges the Peace Community has damaged their “right to a good name” for saying the army is working with paramilitaries. After this alarming step taken by the 17th Brigade, various entities and organizations came out in support of the Peace Community, highlighting their right to denounce paramilitary activity and human rights violations in their region.  Nonetheless, if this judicial process is successful, the Peace Community could lose their legal status in the country.

    Despite these challenges, the Peace Community still celebrated Christmas, honoring how much they have accomplished. They are no strangers to these types of threats from armed actors and have over 20 years of experience resisting them. Grassroots movements such as the Peace Community are facing a difficult year, but they will  not be intimidated.

    FOR Peace Presence 2018 in Review

    We are grateful for completing our 16th year of protective presence in Colombia. In 2018, our team continued to provide physical and political accompaniment to human rights defenders, victims of the armed conflict, and conscientious objectors. In 2018, our protective accompaniment reached the regions of Urabá, with the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, Valle de Cauca and the Pacific Coast of Cauca with CONPAZ and he Inerfaith Justice and Peace Commission, Cesar with Tierra Digna, and Cundinamarca with the Nilo community and ACOOC, the young conscientious objectors of Colombia.

    You can find our complete 2018 Programaic Update by clicking the image below!

    Download (PDF, 6.04MB)